Reaching Fuel Poor Families: Final reports published

Written by Sarah Royston on . Posted in ACE Research, Projects

Reaching Fuel Poor Families

ACE Research has completed the project “Reaching Fuel Poor Families”, which was conducted in partnership with The Children’s Society and funded by Eaga Charitable Trust.

There are currently around 2.23 million children, in 1.08 million families, in fuel poverty (close to half the total number of households, as newly defined) in England. Fuel poverty has severe and long-lasting effects, including on children’s respiratory problems, mental health, hospital admission rates, developmental status, educational attainment and emotional well-being, among other impacts.  For these reasons, take-up of fuel poverty assistance among families is a key concern for policy-makers, service providers and energy companies.

Community-based approaches using trusted intermediaries can be a cost-effective way to engage vulnerable households. One group of local intermediaries is Sure Start Children’s Centres. There are around 3,116 Children’s Centres in England, often located in low-income areas. Our analysis has shown that an estimated 77% of fuel poor families live within one mile of a Children’s Centre. This means these centres offer a potentially valuable opportunity for engaging families with fuel poverty support.

This research project reviewed a range of fuel poverty schemes aimed at families, especially those run through Children’s Centres.  It also involved an in-depth evaluation of one specific scheme based in Mortimer House Children’s Centre, a centre in Bradford run by The Children’s Society.  Findings show that Children’s Centres can play a significant role in engaging fuel poor families, especially if schemes are long-term and work in partnership with other local organisations.  Based on this research, we make recommendations for how local authorities, government, energy companies and the third sector can support engagement with fuel poor families through Children’s Centres.

Further details can be found in the Reaching Fuel Poor Families Research Report or the executive summary.  A separate report provides recommendations for the Mortimer House scheme, and aims to inform the development of this work and a potential roll-out to other centres.

Comments on DECC’s draft fuel poverty strategy for England

Written by Pedro Guertler on . Posted in ACE Research, Projects

fuelpoverty

In the summer of 2014, DECC published a draft fuel poverty strategy for England. This draft strategy states that to effectively combat fuel poverty, fuel poor homes should be brought up to an energy efficiency standard of EPC Band C and a target set accordingly. Setting a high standard for energy efficiency is the correct approach because although it is vital that fuel poor households receive immediate financial support to help them pay their energy bills, it is widely recognised by fuel poverty experts that the only long term solution to fuel poverty is to make homes highly energy efficient.

However, the draft strategy has some very serious flaws. We have prepared a briefing outlining these flaws and setting out what the objectives of the fuel poverty strategy should be. If you are responding to DECC’s consultation on this, feel free to use the briefing to inform your response.

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive calculator

Written by Jack Carrington on . Posted in ACE Research, Home Energy Advice Tool, Projects

System selectrion screen

ACE Research, in partnership with the Energy Saving Trust and Solstice Associates developed a Renewable Heat Incentive calculator for DECC and the Scottish Government. The tool was designed to provide a reliable estimate of the domestic RHI payments for biomass systems, ground and air source heat pumps and solar thermal systems.

ECO and the Green Deal – not enough is not enough

Written by Pedro Guertler on . Posted in ACE Research, Projects

Historical insulation

Today ACE and the Energy Bill Revolution publish a set of slides and a briefing which assess the impact of the Government’s current energy efficiency policies and compare them against past performance and what needs to happen to effectively tackle fuel poverty and meet the recommendations of the Committee on Climate Change.

We find that the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and the Green Deal represent a significant loss of momentum in the deployment of energy efficiency measures compared to previous energy efficiency programmes, especially when considering the large energy efficiency potential still available in the housing stock.

The recent cuts proposed to the ECO are exacerbating this loss of momentum, and the introduction of the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund is not enough to turn it around. This means that carbon targets recommended by the Committee on Climate Change will be missed and that fuel poverty will worsen.

We are calling for:

 

Review of energy efficiency policies in housing

Written by Pedro Guertler on . Posted in ACE Research, Projects

GCB620 dashboard

Commissioned by the Green Construction Board’s Valuation & Demand Group, ACE Research, in partnership with Sweett Group, has delivered a comprehensive but high level qualitative and quantitative review of energy policies targeted at residential buildings over the last 20 years. Throughout, the work was informed and guided by stakeholders in government, industry and the NGO sector.

The main purpose of the work is to support the civil service to maintain a long view on ‘what works’ in residential energy efficiency programmes as staff are turned over. The outputs have been brought together in an interactive dashboard designed as a tool to bring officials up to speed on residential energy efficiency programmes quickly. This is accompanied by a full report and an executive summary. To date, the tool has been presented to, and tested with, DECC, BIS, the Cabinet Office.

Download the project’s resources below, and let us know what you think:

 

Introducing ACE’s 2014 Intern

Written by Pedro Guertler on . Posted in ACE Research

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Bozhidar Bozhkov joined ACE this spring for an internship. He is an MSc student in Economics and Policy of Energy and the Environment at the Energy Institute of University College London. Currently, he is working on his dissertation project and a joint briefing paper with ACE (based on the dissertation), which is intended to offer a systemic review of the Green Deal energy efficiency programme. To achieve a panoramic review of the policy, a number of interviews with experts from government, industry and consumer society will be brought together in an innovative conceptual framework that will capture the intricate dynamics steering the Green Deal’s emerging story.

Reaching fuel poor families

Written by Sarah Royston on . Posted in ACE Research, Projects

TCS

TCSFamilies in fuel poverty are an important policy issue.  ACE research has shown that there are currently 2.23 million children, in 1.08 million families, in fuel poverty (close to half the total number of households, as newly defined) in England. Fuel poverty has severe and long-lasting effects, including on children’s respiratory problems, mental health, hospital admission rates, developmental status, educational attainment and emotional well-being, among other impacts.

Last year, ACE estimated that only 2.9% of energy assistance budgets would reach fuel poor families.  The recent “Behind Cold Doors” report by The Children’s Society showed that 1.9 million children living in poverty in the UK were in families that missed out on a Warm Home Discount (a key form of fuel poverty assistance) in 2013/14. For these reasons, take-up of fuel poverty assistance among families is a key concern for policy-makers, service providers and energy companies.

In this context, Eaga Charitable Trust is funding The Children’s Society and the Association for the Conservation of Energy to carry out the project “Reaching fuel poor families: Informing new approaches to promoting take-up of fuel poverty assistance among families with children”.  This research will review a range of fuel poverty schemes aimed at families, especially those run through Children’s Centres.  It will also involve an in-depth evaluation of one specific scheme based in Mortimer House Children’s Centre, a centre in Bradford run by The Children’s Society.

The project will provide recommendations for this specific scheme, and inform a potential roll-out to other centres.  It will also draw lessons of broader relevance to fuel poverty schemes aimed at families, to help in the design and delivery of effective programmes in future.

“Dragon-breath and snow-melt”: New article on know-how for keeping warm

Written by Sarah Royston on . Posted in Projects

ERSS

What skills and know-how do people use to keep warm at home?  Where does this knowledge come from?  These questions are addressed in a new article by ACE researcher Sarah Royston, published in the journal Energy Research and Social Science.

Keeping warm at home means managing heat flows – making sure that heat is where it is needed, when it is needed.  In doing this, we interact with a wide range of objects, appliances and building features, from long-johns to loft insulation, and from hair-dryers to heat pumps.

Managing heat flows is something we do almost all the time, often without thinking much about it (by opening a window, or putting on a jumper, for example).  But many of the things we do to keep warm involve some kind of practical knowledge or know-how.  For example, we might know how to adjust the settings on a storage heater, programme the central heating,  or light a fire.  Equally we might know how to find and block draughts, or fashion an improvised bed-warmer from an old sock filled with rice.

This article explores the many kinds of know-how involved in keeping homes warm, and how these are learned through experience.  The senses are important here – for example, we might use visible “dragon breath” as an indicator of cold.  The article also looks at how changes such as moving house or having children can affect know-how, and reflects on what these ideas might mean for research, policy and practice on sustainable energy use.

You can read the full article (currently free) here.

Energy Saving Trust Home Energy Check

Written by Jack Carrington on . Posted in Home Energy Advice Tool

EST HEC

Our partners, the Energy Saving Trust asked us to work with them to create a new Home Energy Check tool. Their previous tool had a high drop-out rate due to the number of questions that had to be answered, a key requirement was to provide results for those that wanted results quickly.

Energy Saving Trust is a social enterprise that offers impartial advice to communities and households on how to reduce carbon emissions, use water more sustainably and save money on energy bills. Their Home Energy Check helps people to find out the overall energy efficiency of their home, and the carbon emissions they produce.  They can then see what improvements they can make – to use less energy, save on carbon emissions, improve their Energy Performance Certificate rating, and save money. They take away a full report with all the details of their home’s energy use and the savings they could make.

Try the Home Energy Check here.