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Green Deal and ECO: Operational Issues – A View from the Industry

Comments (4)

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    Chris Hopkins

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    Hard to treat certification must be kept in place but probably extended to building engineers, MBEng, CIOB, this will cut the cost of going to a RICS.
    Must maintain that installers are PAS2030 and GDI.

    if the above 2 points are relaxed , it will be a free for all, masses of unqualified incompetent construction workers will flood the market. imagine the complete mess it would cause.

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    Linn Rafferty (@linniR)

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    hi Jenny
    how interesting to read such a well researched and written article, in particular, your criticism of the extremely conservative savings being assumed in the Golden Rule calculation.

    I have a couple of comments.

    1.7 Credit Brokerage
    It’s not just landlords & community groups that are affected by this. My own GDAO (assessor organisation) does not hold a credit licence and as a result of the guidance, our independent advisors can no longer give their customers any help to find a green deal provider. I don’t think this is good for the customer journey.

    2.3 List of Qualifying Products
    It’s not true that RdSAP always assumes that walls, roofs and floors will meet Building Regulations, but do no better. For some time now, RdSAP has been able to recognise better performing building fabric, but only where evidence of that better performance is available.
    I wonder if you were referring to the ability to recognise better performance in the improvement, rather than in the original property? In which case, whilst a Green Deal assessment can recognise differences in the measure being assessed, it’s true that RdSAP cannot. Is this a case for a Green Deal assessment always being required for ECO measures? Currently it is required for some ECO cases, but not all.

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    Mike Crompton

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    just to add to the point raised by Chris, yes agree that this should not be left in the remit of RICS members only, As you have pointed out there are other accreditation/ certification options with the necessary skill set.
    I would also point out that many who hold Home Inspector (HI) qualification or as sometimes now referred to as Residential Property Surveyors hold the necessary skills and qualifications (many would say that more so than desk based RICS members) also.
    There needs to choice within the market place

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    Tom Fletcher

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    ACE have a made good summary of various areas of concern. Some points invariably are for legal argument.

    1.1 If Lawyers for the GDFC ‘say’ that a telephone transaction complies with the Guidance and funding will be granted, then it is for the courts to decide, if challenged, and not for DECC to clarify on the basis of a ACE’s reading of the Guidance. The reasonable, and practicable, expectation of the Guidance enables Plans to be entered into without delaying the processes further. Additionally in order for consumers to enable measures to be installed quicker – they can always seek to waiver rights to facilitate a speedier process or cash backs expiring etc. This already exists within the MCS environment to overcome potential delays when tariffs are due to reduce or expire. The precedent is already out there and if it benefits the consumer and the legalities are explained – then let the consumer choose what they wish for.

    Consumers want to improve energy efficiency of their properties and the old adage of ‘keep it simple stupid’ KISS is what’s needed.

    It is highly likely that the Green Deal will have two types of consumers – those who can finance themselves [own capital or cheaper loans] and take advantage of the relative cash backs and ECO funding available and those who cannot and require to utilise Green Deal Finance as other options may not be available. Fuel inflation at 2% protects the consumer who is likely to utilise GDF rather than works against them.

    PRS – This area should not become complicated – whoever pays the electricity bills is liable for the GD charge and only when property occupants change do landlords have to assume the costs. It would make sense that if landlords do assume the GD charge, either temporary or permanent responsibility, then the Plan maintains a regulated status given that the occupants [tenants] benefits. Lets not forget a landlord can also contribute to costs, and take advantage of LESA, and the tenant from the outset will benefit from cash backs if 50%+ of GDF is applied to the ‘meter, and this can act as an incentive and sweetener whichever way it is looked upon and reduces overall credit and/or capital costs.

    It is sensible and practicable that ECO post 2015 is made more certain or existing and otherwise many potential Providers, Installers and GDAOs will not feel confident to commit resources to become PAS 2030, obtain credit licences or even provide competitive costs for assessments and installations. Its a numbers game and certainty ensures motivated participants will yield the required return on investment.

    The more everyone talks about the issues the more negative the Green Deal becomes – lets have the government confirm, on the re launch, that everything is in place to move forward, and lets look at and address the problems, if any, after that.

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