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Replacing all that ‘green crap’ won’t be an easy task

Comments (7)

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    graham farrall

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    Can anybody advise me who would the best person to contact at the DECC , to request consideration for acceptance of proven Energy Saving Products

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    Peter Thom

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    Great article Andrew highlighting the dilemma we are now in – going backwards – and not a mention of the sinking green deal ship which is being patched up with ECO and RHI sticky plasters!

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    Keith Lodge

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    There is no choice. Either energy security is achieved now – or there will be no adequate energy for future generations. Politicians and business leaders need to take that into consideration when weighing the cost of economic and social security – or be judged for their treachery in their failure to act.

    Failure to link economic savings from energy conservation and alterative energy distorts the accounting on the costs of sustainable energy. Omitted from the accounting are the reductions in the costs of replacing polluting and aging power plant, the rising costs of depleting non-renewable energy resources, the costs attributable to fuel poverty, or the costs of losses incurred by events attributable to global warming.

    All the technologies are known to save at least 80% of the energy generated burning fossil fuels, and means to generate the remaining 20% from infinite free ambient resources.

    The international market for ‘zero energy’ products is assured and beckons exploitation as the major source of wealth creation.

    Current UK political hesitation and vacillations on policies to support relevant developments only opens up the market to other notions, like China and several European countries, where such developments are already yielding profits. In the housing sector practically all of the relevant products are only available from abroad. How goes that make economic sense ?

    It is not ‘green’ that is crap – it is fossil fuels that are serious crap !

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    graham farrall

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    As you have got connections to Senior MP’s Could you please raise the following questions please
    If a Companies products have an ISO accreditation why is it not acceptable for Government Funding under the likes of Green Deal and ECO etc

    We are members of the EU and it is Mandatory to accept the testing accreditation of ISO , to avoid the duplication of testing and the NEED for subsequent testing , this was also reinforced by the addition of the CE marking

    And yet you cannot undertake any contracts without the BBA approval ,

    Which is a duplication of the European approval already granted under the ISO , the BBA also want to charge you an extortionate amount of money which SME’S just cannot afford , plus you could have to wait months if not years if you ARE FORCED to go down that route

    I have spoken to hundreds of other equally frustrated business people , who describe the situation as a ” CARTEL ” with it’s Financial benefits clearly for the Government coffers

    I have raised this with my Local European MP who just ignores the situation , obviously not in his interest , for some reason

    What do we do about it I ASK ? When the Legislation is already in place

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      Andrew Warren

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      Graham
      Thanks for writing, and apologies for the tardy reply. Just to re emphasise, any UK company can obtain accreditation from the equivalent organisations to the BBA based in any of the other 27 EUcountries.
      Andrew Warren

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      Andrew Warren

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      Tony
      Thanks for these kind comments. I still retain a quaint belief that in the end logical , sensible arguments do win in the end. It is simply that the end may not arrive quite as swiftly as you and I might like.
      Andrew Warren

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    Tony Worthington

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    A great article and depressing to think of the energy famines that may be the future (anyone remember the 1970’s power cuts)? It is hard to see an easy way forward given the competing interests and I agree that a good solution would be to use the stamp duty system to reward those installing energy saving measures. Where I think this breaks down though is in assuming the pro’s involved would drive energy saving forward – there’s nothing in it for them so why would they?

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